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Authority record

1st Coniston Wolf Cub Pack

  • 027
  • Corporate body
  • 1948 - After 1962

Robert Baden-Powell's book, Scouting for Boys, was first published in England in 1908. Shortly after, Scouts began forming all over Canada. In 1910, a Dominion Council was established and Governor General Earl Grey accepted the position of Chief Scout for Canada. The Boy Scouts Association was incorporated in the United Kingdom two years later. In June 1914, a Canadian branch of that organization - The Canadian General Council of the Boy Scouts Association - was incorporated. In 1920, the International Conference, to which all recognized Boy Scout associations belonged, was formed.

The first meeting of the 1st Coniston Wolf Cub Pack, which was part of the Coniston Boy Scout Association was in October 1948. This 1st troop was affiliated with the All Saints Anglican Church and, in late 1948, a 2nd troop was formed which was affiliated with the Catholic Church (the French speaking boys attended Our Lady of Mercy Church while the English speaking boys attended St. Paul's Church). Both troops existed at the same time in Coniston and frequently participated in events and fundraising together. The 1st Coniston Wolf Cub Pack held their troop meetings on Tuesday nights, but they would have events, such as tobogganing parties and parades, on other days of the week. Regular activities of the troop included camping, hiking, first aid training, hockey, watching National Film Board movies, and father & son banquets. The troop was funded through various fundraising activities, such as candy sales on Valentine's Day.

In September 1956, the 1st Coniston Troop approached the 2nd Troop with the proposition of forming one group for Coniston. Bishop Dignan gave permission for boys from the 1st Troop to join, provided the 2nd Troop had control of the troop. During 1956 and 1957, the 2nd troop had difficulties recruiting Cub Masters who had the time to volunteer and the group folded by 1958 with the remainder of their bank balance being donated to the 1st Coniston Group Committee on November 12, 1962.

Presidents (Chairmen) listed in the scrapbook were:
Roy Snitch (1948 - 1949)
J. Rogerson (1952 - 1953)

Abramov, Ayala Zacks

  • CA-AA
  • Person
  • 1912-

Sam and Ayala Zacks were prominent Canadian art collectors of international repute active in the mid-20th century whose gifts form the basis of the modern European art collection at the Art Gallery of Ontario. Ayala Ben Tovim Fleg Zacks Abramov (1912-) was born in Jerusalem and educated in Israel, Paris and London. In 1938 she married Maurice Fleg in Paris, and joined the French Resistance after her husband died in action in1940. Active in Zionist circles after the war, she met Sam Zacks in Switzerland. Samuel J. Zacks (1904-1970) was a financier, Zionist and art collector, born in Kingston Ontario and educated at Queen’s University and Harvard. Following their marriage in 1947 they immediately began to collect art of the School of Paris as well as Canadian and Israeli art and antiquities, amassing an extensive collection by the late 1950’s that was in continual demand by museums around the world. In 1956 a collection of Canadian art was donated to Queen’s University, Mr. Zack’s alma mater, the first of many significant gifts to institutions in Israel and Canada including the Hazor Archaeological Museum, the Royal Ontario Museum and the Art Gallery of Ontario. Mr. and Mrs. Zacks were both involved in international art circles, sitting on the Boards of the International Committee of Museums (ICOM), a branch of UNESCO, the International Committee of the Museum of Modern Art, the Art Gallery of Ontario and others. In 1969 Mr. Zacks received an Honourary Fellowship from St. Peter’s College, Oxford. He died in 1970 in Toronto. After his death, Ayala Zacks was awarded the Order of Canada and an honourary degree from the University of Toronto. She married Zalman Abramov, an Israeli lawyer and politician in 1976 and moved permanently to Israel in 1982.

APT Environment

  • S096
  • Corporate body

APT Environment is an environmental organization in Elmira, Ontario, that is interested in the Chemtura Canada Company, formerly Uniroyal Chemical and Crompton Company. Since 1941 the plant has undergone various name and ownership changes. From 1966-2000 the plant operated as Uniroyal Chemical, from 2000-2006 as Crompton Company, and on July 1, 2006 formally changed its name to Chemtura Canada Company.

Art Institute of Ontario.

  • AGOAC00033
  • Corporate body
  • 1951 - 1968

The Art Institute of Ontario (AIO) was incorporated in 1951 to circulate art exhibitions, lecturers, and instructional programmes to venues in smaller communities. The idea of an art institute had been discussed informally as early as 1948, and the Art Gallery of Toronto had organized circulating exhibitions. The AIO was formed when a grant from the Ontario Department of Education made it possible to sponsor a travelling exhibition throughout the province. Later grants from the Atkinson Foundation, the Canada Council, and the Province of Ontario Council for the Arts supported AIO’s operations. The AIO was an alliance of several Ontario visual arts institutions and organizations. Its founding members were the Art Gallery of Hamilton, Art Gallery of Toronto (now Art Gallery of Ontario), Hart House (University of Toronto), London Public Library & Art Museum, National Gallery of Canada, Ontario Association of Architects, Ontario Society of Artists, Royal Ontario Museum, Willistead Library and Art Gallery (Windsor) and the Windsor Art Association. The AIO maintained close ties with the Art Gallery of Ontario throughout its existence. It was absorbed into the extension programme of the AGO in 1968.

Arts and Letters Club of Burlington

  • BHS0001
  • Corporate body
  • 1948 -

The Arts and Letters Club of Burlington, Ontario was formed in 1948 by a small group of dedicated women as an out-growth of the Roseland Book Club. Its purpose was to develop interest in literature and the arts, through the circulation of books, lectures on literary topics, art, music, films and drama. The early meetings were held in the Lion’s Club Hall, later in Trefoil Lodge, and then in the Burlington Central Library.

Bagnani, Gilbert, 1900-1985

  • AGOAC00541
  • Person
  • 1900 - 1985

Gilbert Forrest Bagnani (1900-1985) was a professor of ancient history. He was born in Rome to General Ugo Bagnani and Florence Dewar. He served as a Second Lieutenant of artillery towards the end of World War I. After the War he returned to the University of Rome where he received his doctorate. Instead of entering law as he had planned, he turned to the Italian School of Archaeology in Athens to study antiquities. In 1929 Gilbert married Mary Augusta Stewart Houston (1903-1996) of Toronto, daughter of Stewart Houston (editor of "The Financial Post") and Augusta Robinson (daughter of John Beverley Robinson, Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario, and granddaughter of Sir John Beverley Robinson, Chief Justice and Attorney-General of Upper Canada). Gilbert and Stewart had an apartment in Rome and for seven seasons worked, in the Sahara Desert, with the Royal Archaeological Mission to Egypt. In 1937 they fled fascist Italy and purchased a 200 acre farm and house built around 1845 near Port Hope, Ontario and named it "Vogrie". In 1945 Gilbert was invited to teach ancient history at the University of Toronto and in 1958 became a Professor. He retired from the University of Toronto in 1965. The Bagnanis returned to "Vogrie". In the same year, Gilbert was asked to accept a term-appointment at Trent University. He was honoured with a LL.D. by Trent in 1971 and he continued to teach as a Professor of Ancient History until 1975.

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